wire-man:

Just when I though I had my entire terrarium organized by growth rate, Nepenthes boschiana decides to throw out a 10 inch leaf… That better be a spectacular pitcher when it forms.

wire-man:

Just when I though I had my entire terrarium organized by growth rate, Nepenthes boschiana decides to throw out a 10 inch leaf… That better be a spectacular pitcher when it forms.

theflytrapqueen:

Sarracenia purpurea venosa. Tatnall County, GA. Brad Wilson, DVM.

random-stuff-from-jayhurl:

Some random shots around the glasshouse showing the sarracenia pitchers forming and the flowers opening.

A nice place to hang out on a Spring morning

stickytraps asked: Hope you don't mind me asking another question or two....! Do you find that using the fogger causes a temperature drop? I'm looking to get a further drop of perhaps 3-4 degrees C at night, without spending serious money. If the fogger drops it a couple of degrees that would probably be fine. Have you had any problems with the fogger - it seems some people like it, but a lot have had problems with it breaking within a month or so. Just a bit worrying!

random-stuff-from-jayhurl:

Hi sorry for the delay replying. I don’t measure the min temp as I only have a standard thermometer so can’t answer your question. As I only run the fogger for a limited time I would guess any temperature drop is minimal. But if you chilled the water in the fridge prior to fogging I would guess you word get a nice temp drop while the fogger was working.

Up to the point you asked the question about reliability the fogger was fine. As soon as I turned it in that day it stopped working, so I have it in bits now trying to sort it out and am using a water squirter instead!

aaargh! sorry, I really shouldn’t have asked about reliability! Tempting fate…
I’ve now set up the Neps in a 4 tier mini-greenhouse inside the plant room, under T4 lights, with a 50w aquarium heater set at 25C. I bought a really cheap min-max digital thermometer for a few pounds and it makes life so much easier than my old analogue one, and it also records min-max humidity. I now have night temps down to about 15-16C, and days up to 22/23C, with humidity 90% or above.They seem to like it at the moment…

fuckyeahcarnivorousplants:

DSC_8123
fuckyeahcarnivorousplants:


Utricularia gibba



Taken with a 18-55mm canon kit lens reversed onto an 85 mm lens. The aperture was 16 on the 18-55mm and 1.8 on the 85 mm.



wow

fuckyeahcarnivorousplants:

Utricularia gibba

Taken with a 18-55mm canon kit lens reversed onto an 85 mm lens. The aperture was 16 on the 18-55mm and 1.8 on the 85 mm.

wow

forestspirit-waterspirit:

Flytrap Frolic
Saturday April 26, 2014  9am-1pm3800 Canterbury Rd, Wilmington, NC
The Coastal Land Trust will be hosting the fourth annual Flytrap Frolic on Saturday, April 26th at the Stanley Rehder Carnivorous Plant Garden, located behind the Alderman Elementary School, in Wilmington, NC.Special activities include walking tours of the Garden, “flytrap” kids’ crafts, live snakes from Halyburton Park, geo-caching, plant scavenger hunts, presentations about our region’s carnivorous plants, and MORE!Bring your neighbors, friends, and family to this free event to learn about our native insectivorous plants such as the Venus Flytrap, Pitcher Plants, and Sundews!
(More information)                               Photo credit: Tommy Barham

forestspirit-waterspirit:

Flytrap Frolic

Saturday April 26, 2014 
9am-1pm
3800 Canterbury Rd, Wilmington, NC

The Coastal Land Trust will be hosting the fourth annual Flytrap Frolic on Saturday, April 26th at the Stanley Rehder Carnivorous Plant Garden, located behind the Alderman Elementary School, in Wilmington, NC.

Special activities include walking tours of the Garden, “flytrap” kids’ crafts, live snakes from Halyburton Park, geo-caching, plant scavenger hunts, presentations about our region’s carnivorous plants, and MORE!

Bring your neighbors, friends, and family to this free event to learn about our native insectivorous plants such as the Venus Flytrap, Pitcher Plants, and Sundews!

(More information)                               Photo credit: Tommy Barham

deusofnull:

The florid crown of Utricularia vulgaris, who by means of creating a negative pressure region within tiny sacks in the water, via active osmosis, sucks in prey in under a 100th of a second.  One of the most successful plants within the carnivorous flora niche.  Quite beautiful flowers for us to look at, but if your a Daphnia (water flea) or Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode) then watch out. 

deusofnull:

The florid crown of Utricularia vulgaris, who by means of creating a negative pressure region within tiny sacks in the water, via active osmosis, sucks in prey in under a 100th of a second.  One of the most successful plants within the carnivorous flora niche.  Quite beautiful flowers for us to look at, but if your a Daphnia (water flea) or Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode) then watch out. 

Highland Nepenthes - new home
During the last few weeks I have been giving a lot of thought to the best home for my Nepenthes. They have tended to be moved from the conservatory in summer to the house in winter, and although they have grown and produced pitchers I have felt that they haven’t been given the best conditions. Ideally, I wanted them to be in a fixed home providing the best conditions possible - without spending a fortune on air conditioning, heating, or fogging systems!
At first I considered ways of bringing the night temperatures down inside the house - but although I’ve read about many ingenious solutions, none seemed to offer long term success. Conditions in the kitchen gave a better nightly drop, but it was still a rather stable temperature.
So I decided to work the other way around - move them to a permanently cooler place, and raise the temperatures (as required), rather than try to lower them.
The obvious location: the Plant Room (a.k.a. converted garage ‘office’).
After considering reptile heating lamps, basking pads, and such like, I have settled on a submersible aquarium heater in a 30 litre tub of water placed on a shelf at the bottom of the Nepenthes mini-greenhouse. This can be set to any temperature between 17C - 31C, and the theory is the water tub acts as a radiator to warm the air inside the mini-greenhouse. The heater is set to 25C at the moment, and it’s working really well, with day temps up to around 22C and nights falling to around 15C. Humidity is between 80 - 100%. I have an old P.C. fan which I shall set on a timer to create some air circulation. In particularly cold spells, an air heater on a thermostat can be used to keep the ambient temp a little higher.
I’ll let you know how the plants respond this year…

Highland Nepenthes - new home

During the last few weeks I have been giving a lot of thought to the best home for my Nepenthes. They have tended to be moved from the conservatory in summer to the house in winter, and although they have grown and produced pitchers I have felt that they haven’t been given the best conditions. Ideally, I wanted them to be in a fixed home providing the best conditions possible - without spending a fortune on air conditioning, heating, or fogging systems!

At first I considered ways of bringing the night temperatures down inside the house - but although I’ve read about many ingenious solutions, none seemed to offer long term success. Conditions in the kitchen gave a better nightly drop, but it was still a rather stable temperature.

So I decided to work the other way around - move them to a permanently cooler place, and raise the temperatures (as required), rather than try to lower them.

The obvious location: the Plant Room (a.k.a. converted garage ‘office’).

After considering reptile heating lamps, basking pads, and such like, I have settled on a submersible aquarium heater in a 30 litre tub of water placed on a shelf at the bottom of the Nepenthes mini-greenhouse. This can be set to any temperature between 17C - 31C, and the theory is the water tub acts as a radiator to warm the air inside the mini-greenhouse. The heater is set to 25C at the moment, and it’s working really well, with day temps up to around 22C and nights falling to around 15C. Humidity is between 80 - 100%. I have an old P.C. fan which I shall set on a timer to create some air circulation. In particularly cold spells, an air heater on a thermostat can be used to keep the ambient temp a little higher.

I’ll let you know how the plants respond this year…

Pinguicula ehlersiae ‘Santa Gertrudis’
Two plants putting on a fine display this morning…